Confederation Marine Modellers

         

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

A great time was had at the CMM annual Hi-Point held at Spencer Smith Park.  Thanks to Spencer's Landing generous financial support we were able to secure exclusive use of the pond and the City also made sure the fllter pumps were off (getting the lawn sprinklers turned off seemed to be a bigger issue but it happened finally).
We were lucky enough to have twenty competitors with 28 boats entered in the competition.  Along with good representation from CMM we had competitors from Buffalo and from the Kitchener area.
At the end of the day results were like this:
Predicted Log -  Don Spielberger - Buffalo
                            George Specht - Buffalo
                            John Brokenshire - CMM

Precision Steering - Paul Spielberger - Buffalo
                                   Don Spielberger - Buffalo
                                   George Specht - Buffalo


Many thanks to Doug for all the running of the competition, Morley for delivering and taking back the trailer, Frank for all the pizza and cold drinks and Steve for all the planning.

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

Recent events - CMM Hi-point, 8th July.

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

The Word from the Quarterdeck

Nautical lore - Toronto's Atlantic ocean liners

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

July 2018

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

Surprising thought it may seem, there were two, and only two, ocean liners registered at Toronto, a port they never even saw.

Our next club meeting will be on Tuesday 11th September at 7:30pm..

​Our next public display will be an exhibition at the Port Dover Harbour Museum on 21st and 22nd July.

          At the end of May I attended our “Boats in the Park” annual event, our cornerstone annual event for Confederation Marine Modellers. As I stood back and looked at the event I marvelled at many aspects of it and I’ll try to describe them:
          Venue – The Hamilton Museum of Steam and Technology is a beautiful place to spend an afternoon even when there aren’t special events going on. The Museum reaches out especially to our members in that almost all of us are tech geeks in one way or another. We have the knowledge to understand what went on with the huge pumps that provided water for Hamilton a hundred years ago. And, on top of that, the Museum supports us continuously and generously though our use of the meeting space, storage of our pond and help with promotion and running of our events there.
          Camaraderie – It always amazes me how our members come together to make an event happen. Planning seems to happen almost automatically and on the day of the event guys show up on time and put it together very quickly (get there early or you’ll miss out on the fun) and seemingly effortlessly. Lots of joking goes on and then, almost always, off to Tim’s for a coffee.
          Public Participation – To see how the public shows up to look at our boats and to ask lots of questions (Does that sailboat have a propeller?) tells me that we don’t just play with toy boats; we create engineering marvels that are unique and beautiful and people want to know all about them. Add to that the fun of the balloon busters and the opportunity for kids to run the pusher tugs and you have a fun filled day for modellers and visitors alike.
          Exchange of Ideas – At quieter times during these events we see boaters chatting in pairs or small groups and more often than not the topic is the “How do I?” question. At that event I asked Don Hodgson about how he powered the lights to the superstructure on his new cabin cruiser and he generously spent time to show me the brass contacts he had bent over the coaming and inside the cabin wall to enable him to remove the cabin without having to disconnect wires. Brilliant, I thought, and by the next week I had replicated his system in my new tug thus enabling me to move the lighting battery lower in the rather top heavy boat.

There are many, many reasons to attend our CMM club events; these are just a few.

Paul Charles